The Story of French Impressionism, Part XIII: Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) (pronounced either: "go" or "goff" or "gah") was actually a Dutch artist, though he was certainly part of the extent group of French Post-Impressionists. Self-Portrait (1887) -one of many self-portraits he completed in his lifetime. He was an incredibly prolific artist, creating around 2,100 paintings (or something like 4 paintings every … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part XIII: Vincent van Gogh

Notes on Additions to the Book of Daniel

In addition to the Story of Susanna, the Book of Daniel has two other chief additions, or perhaps latter revisions: The Song of the Three Children, and Bel and the Dragon. Neither are considered canonical according to Hebrew or Protestant traditions, however certain Eastern, Orthodox, and Catholic traditions accept these short additions as Biblical. The texts also appear … Continue reading Notes on Additions to the Book of Daniel

Notes on the Book of Baruch and the Epistle of Jeremy

Baruch was the scribe of Jeremiah, the prophet of ancient Israel during the rule of Babylon. The Book of Baruch is a scattered collection of writings attributed to Jeremiah and his scribe, Baruch. It contains two chief parts (Chapter 1-3, and Chapters 4-5) followed by the letter of Jeremiah which is included as Chapter 6. The … Continue reading Notes on the Book of Baruch and the Epistle of Jeremy

The Story of French Impressionism, Part XII: Armand Guillaumin

Armand Guillaumin (1841-1927) (pronounced: "ar-mone Gee-yoman") was born in Paris. He worked in his uncle's lingerie shop, and he also worked for the French government for a spell. While studying, he met Camille Pissarro and Paul Cézanne, though he never met their popularity nor critical reception. Guillaumin won the lottery which allowed him to quit … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part XII: Armand Guillaumin

The Story of French Impressionism, Part XI: Georges Seurat and Paul Signac

Georges Seurat (1859-1891) and Paul Signac (1865-1935) are generally associated with "Post-Impressionism" and "Pointillism." Georges Seurat (pronounced "George Sir-rah") was born in Paris. His father grew wealthy from various real estate speculative investments. He studied art as a young man and developed refined sensibilities, as well as mathematical precision in his works. The Suburbs (1882–1883) … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part XI: Georges Seurat and Paul Signac

The Story of French Impressionism, Part X: Paul Gauguin

Paul Gaugin (1848-1903) (pronounced "go-gan") was born during a tumultuous political epoch of revolutionary upheaval throughout Europe. His mother descended from both Spanish aristocracy, as well as socialist revolutionaries, while Gauguin's father ran a Socialist newspaper that was suppressed forcing the young family to flee Paris. Young Paul idolized his grandmother on his mother's side, … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part X: Paul Gauguin

Dionysus’s Descent Into Hades In The Frogs

The Frogs is my favorite of Aristophanes's comedies. It is the only Aristophanean comedy to feature a god at the beginning -Dionysus, the god of the theatre, and his slave Xanthias. As they walk, Xanthias is meta-textually concerned with telling jokes that will make the audience laugh, and laughter presupposes some kind of suffering, though the … Continue reading Dionysus’s Descent Into Hades In The Frogs

Aristophanes’s The Birds: A New City in the Sky

Aristophanes The Birds ("Ornithets") is the only comedy written by Aristophanes whose entire action takes place far from the city of Athens. Consequently, the play makes little mention of the circumstances of the Peloponnesian War, or of contemporary Athenian politics. It won second prize at the Dionysia in 414 BC. It is a play about the … Continue reading Aristophanes’s The Birds: A New City in the Sky