The Story of French Impressionism, Part XIII: Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) (pronounced either: "go" or "goff" or "gah") was actually a Dutch artist, though he was certainly part of the extent group of French Post-Impressionists. Self-Portrait (1887) -one of many self-portraits he completed in his lifetime. He was an incredibly prolific artist, creating around 2,100 paintings (or something like 4 paintings every … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part XIII: Vincent van Gogh

Notes on Additions to the Book of Daniel

In addition to the Story of Susanna, the Book of Daniel has two other chief additions, or perhaps latter revisions: The Song of the Three Children, and Bel and the Dragon. Neither are considered canonical according to Hebrew or Protestant traditions, however certain Eastern, Orthodox, and Catholic traditions accept these short additions as Biblical. The texts also appear … Continue reading Notes on Additions to the Book of Daniel

Notes on the Book of Baruch and the Epistle of Jeremy

Baruch was the scribe of Jeremiah, the prophet of ancient Israel during the rule of Babylon. The Book of Baruch is a scattered collection of writings attributed to Jeremiah and his scribe, Baruch. It contains two chief parts (Chapter 1-3, and Chapters 4-5) followed by the letter of Jeremiah which is included as Chapter 6. The … Continue reading Notes on the Book of Baruch and the Epistle of Jeremy

The Story of French Impressionism, Part XII: Armand Guillaumin

Armand Guillaumin (1841-1927) (pronounced: "ar-mone Gee-yoman") was born in Paris. He worked in his uncle's lingerie shop, and he also worked for the French government for a spell. While studying, he met Camille Pissarro and Paul Cézanne, though he never met their popularity nor critical reception. Guillaumin won the lottery which allowed him to quit … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part XII: Armand Guillaumin