Roman Britain – Julius Caesar Invades Britannia (55-54 BC)

Winston Churchill opens his History of English Speaking Peoples with the following: “In the summer of the Roman year 699, now described as the year 55 before the birth of Christ, the Proconsul of Gaul, Gaius Julius Caesar, turned his gaze upon Britain” (1). But before turning his gaze Britain, Julius Caesar was in the … Continue reading Roman Britain – Julius Caesar Invades Britannia (55-54 BC)

Pre-Roman Britain

The idea of England did not appear until the eighth century when the "Venerable" Bede, a Northumbrian Benedictine monk, wrote his famous Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum, or "Ecclesiastical History of the English People," a book which highlights the tension between Celtic and Catholic interpretations of Christianity in England. The book details the Anglo-Saxon invasions of … Continue reading Pre-Roman Britain

Notes on the Life and Works of Rembrandt van Rijn

Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669) Rembrandt was born in 1606 in the Dutch Republic (no the Netherlands) to a miller and a baker's daughter. Since much of his artwork has had such religious influence, Rembrandt's mother was a Roman Catholic and his father was a member of the Dutch Reform Church. Rembrandt grew up in Leidin, … Continue reading Notes on the Life and Works of Rembrandt van Rijn

The Story of French Impressionism, Part XIII: Vincent van Gogh

Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) (pronounced either: "go" or "goff" or "gah") was actually a Dutch artist, though he was certainly part of the extent group of French Post-Impressionists. Self-Portrait (1887) -one of many self-portraits he completed in his lifetime. He was an incredibly prolific artist, creating around 2,100 paintings (or something like 4 paintings every … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part XIII: Vincent van Gogh

The Story of French Impressionism, Part XII: Armand Guillaumin

Armand Guillaumin (1841-1927) (pronounced: "ar-mone Gee-yoman") was born in Paris. He worked in his uncle's lingerie shop, and he also worked for the French government for a spell. While studying, he met Camille Pissarro and Paul Cézanne, though he never met their popularity nor critical reception. Guillaumin won the lottery which allowed him to quit … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part XII: Armand Guillaumin