An Appeal to Common Wisdom in the Final Tale: The Parson’s Tale

The "Parson's Tale" is the final story of The Canterbury Tales. In the "General Prologue," the Parson is described as a 'good man of religion.' He is erudite, scholarly, devout, and forgiving. The Parson believes that in order to be a good priest he must be perfect, because sheep follow their shepherd, but only if … Continue reading An Appeal to Common Wisdom in the Final Tale: The Parson’s Tale

Gone With The Wind: An American Epic of Nostalgia and Survivalism

"...tomorrow is another day." In a rare interview with the Atlanta Journal in 1936, Margaret "Peggy" Mitchell described her debut (and only) novel, Gone With The Wind, as "the story of a girl named Scarlett O’Hara, who lived in Atlanta during the Civil War and the days of Reconstruction. The book isn’t strictly a book … Continue reading Gone With The Wind: An American Epic of Nostalgia and Survivalism

What Is A Eulogy? Ethos, Pathos, and Logos In Pericles’s Funeral Oration Speech

Thucydides offers one-hundred and forty-one speeches in his monumental history of the Peloponnesian War, yet the early eulogy offered by Pericles (in Book II) is surely the most famous. The word "eulogy" comes down to us from the Greek word eulogia meaning to offer praise, or even high praise. Pericles delivers his famous eulogy, the … Continue reading What Is A Eulogy? Ethos, Pathos, and Logos In Pericles’s Funeral Oration Speech