An Appeal to Common Wisdom in the Final Tale: The Parson’s Tale

The "Parson's Tale" is the final story of The Canterbury Tales. In the "General Prologue," the Parson is described as a 'good man of religion.' He is erudite, scholarly, devout, and forgiving. The Parson believes that in order to be a good priest he must be perfect, because sheep follow their shepherd, but only if … Continue reading An Appeal to Common Wisdom in the Final Tale: The Parson’s Tale

On The Wisdom of Silence in The Manciple’s Tale

After the close of the "Canon's Yeoman's Tale" the Host merrily asks the embarrassingly drunken Cook to tell a tale (his earlier tale was left unfinished). However, the Cook can barely sit upon his horse, much less tell a tale. We find his character laughable because of his immoderate alcohol consumption and his physical ridiculousness … Continue reading On The Wisdom of Silence in The Manciple’s Tale