The Story of French Impressionism, Part III: Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919) was born into a lower middle-class family in France. His father was a tailor and his mother worked as a seamstress. At a young age he wanted to be a singer, however due to his family's financial concerns, he went to work in a porcelain factory until a new mechanized procedure was … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part III: Pierre-Auguste Renoir

Notes on the Trachiniae

In The Women of Trachis, also called the Trachiniae, Sophocles exposes the audience to the recollections of a domestic woman, Deianira (Greek for "destroyer of husband"), and wife of the great Heracles (Romanized as Hercules). In contract to Aeschylus's portrayal of Clytemnestra at the end of the Trojan War in his Oresteia, the audience is compelled to sympathize … Continue reading Notes on the Trachiniae

Plato’s Republic Book II (Part I): Glaucon and Adeimantus

Glaucon and Adeimantus, both brothers and Athenians (brothers of Plato), make up the bulk of the remainder of the Republic. Both brothers are praised by Socrates for their noble actions as soldiers at Megara and also for their aristocratic lineage, descending from Ariston (meaning "excellence"). The Battle of Megara was a crucial victory for the Athenians … Continue reading Plato’s Republic Book II (Part I): Glaucon and Adeimantus