Brief Thoughts on The Trojan Women

Known in Latin as the Troades, Euripides's The Trojan Women was said by Aelian's Varia Historica (published in the third century A.D.) to have been performed for the first time in 415 BC at the 91st Olympiad. Ultimately, he won second place, losing to Xenocles, a now lost Athenian tragedian. The Trojan Women was part three of a group of three tragedies … Continue reading Brief Thoughts on The Trojan Women

Plato’s Republic, Book IV: The Cardinal Virtues

Book IV ends the conversation "pertaining to the gods" between Socrates and Glaucon. It begins with an interruption by Adeimantus, who has thus far been remote from the conversation. His accusation against Socrates is that the men will lead unhappy lives. The communistic life, as described at the end of Book III, does not allow … Continue reading Plato’s Republic, Book IV: The Cardinal Virtues

Plato’s Republic Book II (Part II): The City in Speech

In the second half of Book II, Socrates is put on trial, reluctantly defending justice against the false accusations of the Athenian brothers, Glaucon and Adeimantus. He suggests they examine the question of justice in a larger way, not like men who are squinting at small letters from a distance. Socrates proposes that they watch … Continue reading Plato’s Republic Book II (Part II): The City in Speech