The Sicilian Expedition: Alcibiades and Nicias in Thucydides’s Peloponnesian War (Books VI-VII)

Thucydides claims the Peloponnesian War is the greatest event or movement in human history, and the most important part of this great war takes place in Books VI-VII: The ill-fated Sicilian Expedition. The Sicilian Expedition represents the turning point in the war. Thucydides begins to explain the expedition by offering a history of the origins … Continue reading The Sicilian Expedition: Alcibiades and Nicias in Thucydides’s Peloponnesian War (Books VI-VII)

Further Thoughts on Aristotle’s Politics

Aristotle's treatise on politics is the essential work on political philosophy from classical antiquity. Since the death of Socrates, philosophy had to learn to conceal itself from the wayward opinions of the majority. People are biased and occasionally these biases are directed at people in an unenlightened way. Each age and political regime carries certain … Continue reading Further Thoughts on Aristotle’s Politics

Political Theology in the Bible: An Exegesis

The account of human life offered in the Bible is radically different from the writings of Plato and Aristotle in classical antiquity. In the Bible, an infinitely distant God creates the world and then places humans in it. He is an artisan and a poet -He speaks life into existence. However, the account of His … Continue reading Political Theology in the Bible: An Exegesis

Jonathan Swift and the Idea of Satire

The term "satire" comes down to us from the Classical Greek word for "satyr drama." The best example of a surviving satyr play is Euripides's Cyclops, and though we have a limited perspective on these tetralogical comedies, we believe they originated from Dionysian drunken revelries, and that they once concluded a series of high tragic … Continue reading Jonathan Swift and the Idea of Satire