On the Definitions, Postulates, and Common Notions of Euclid’s Elements

Euclid's Elements ("Stoikheîon") is the foundational text of classical, axiomatic, and deductive geometry ("earth-measurement"). The Elements is composed of thirteen books, each filled with propositions that beautifully unfold a theory of number, shape, proportion, and measurability. The Elements was the essential geomtery textbook for nearly 2,000 years thanks to the preservation efforts of the Byzantines, … Continue reading On the Definitions, Postulates, and Common Notions of Euclid’s Elements

“Crawling Between Earth and Heaven:” A Reading of Hamlet

Hamlet is a deeply puzzling and unsettling play. It remains elusive, alluring, cryptic, macabre, and mysterious: it is Shakespeare's drama par excellence (contrary to T.S. Eliot's unimpressive criticism of the play). On the surface, Hamlet is a classic revenge story that mirrors the theatrical works of classical antiquity. However, upon closer investigation Hamlet draws on … Continue reading “Crawling Between Earth and Heaven:” A Reading of Hamlet

On Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery”

"Lottery in June, corn be heavy soon" -fictional proverb The year was 1948. The New Yorker Magazine was celebrating its 23rd anniversary when it published a disturbing little story called "The Lottery." The story was to cause decades of controversy. At the time, The New Yorker apparently did not distinguish between works of fact or … Continue reading On Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery”

Reflections On Aristotle’s Prime Unmoved Mover

The summit of Aristotle's examination of "first philosophy" occurs in Book XII of his Metaphysics. Chapters 1-5 of Book XII reiterate Aristotle's examination into the nature of thinghood (an inquiry which had previously appeared in Aristotle's Physics). Thinghood is a kind of whole (not a part of a whole) representing the sources as well as … Continue reading Reflections On Aristotle’s Prime Unmoved Mover