The Meaning of Innocence in To Kill A Mockingbird

"'...before I can live with other folks I've got to live with myself. The one thing that doesn't abide by majority rule is a person's conscience'" (105). I have always loved To Kill A Mockingbird. It is a gentle and compassionate novel confronting a difficult subject matter -the issue of racism in America. As I … Continue reading The Meaning of Innocence in To Kill A Mockingbird

Love and War In For Whom The Bell Tolls

For Whom The Bell Tolls is the novel that was supposed to win Ernest Hemingway his first Pulitzer Prize in 1941. However, like Sinclair Lewis before him, Hemingway was denied the prize by the President of Columbia University. As the story goes, the 1941 Novel Jury recommended several books for the Pulitzer Prize including, but … Continue reading Love and War In For Whom The Bell Tolls

Gone With The Wind: An American Epic of Nostalgia and Survivalism

"...tomorrow is another day." In a rare interview with the Atlanta Journal in 1936, Margaret "Peggy" Mitchell described her debut (and only) novel, Gone With The Wind, as follows: "...the story of a girl named Scarlett O’Hara, who lived in Atlanta during the Civil War and the days of Reconstruction. The book isn’t strictly a … Continue reading Gone With The Wind: An American Epic of Nostalgia and Survivalism