The Story of French Impressionism, Part VII: Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas (1834-1917) (pronounced "day-dahs" but in later life he changed the pronunciation to "day-gah") never wished to be called an "Impressionist" instead preferring to be called a "Realist." In his paintings he was obsessed with motion, particularly of dancers, which occupied nearly half of his works. Degas was raised in an upper middles-class family. … Continue reading The Story of French Impressionism, Part VII: Edgar Degas

The Harsh But Forgiving Prairie in O Pioneers!

I recently detoured from reading the Pulitzer Prize-winning novels to venture into the harsh but pleasantly forgiving fields of Willa Cather's pioneers on the prairie. "Wasatch Mountains and Great Plains in distance, Nebraska" by Albert Bierstadt in 1877 When Willa Cather was thirty-nine years old she wrote her first novel, Alexander's Bridge, which was published … Continue reading The Harsh But Forgiving Prairie in O Pioneers!