On the Definitions, Postulates, and Common Notions of Euclid’s Elements

Euclid's Elements ("Stoikheîon") is the foundational text of classical, axiomatic, and deductive geometry ("earth-measurement"). The Elements is composed of thirteen books, each filled with propositions that beautifully unfold a theory of number, shape, proportion, and measurability. The Elements was the essential geomtery textbook for nearly 2,000 years thanks to the preservation efforts of the Byzantines, … Continue reading On the Definitions, Postulates, and Common Notions of Euclid’s Elements

Reflections On Aristotle’s Prime Unmoved Mover

The summit of Aristotle's examination of "first philosophy" occurs in Book XII of his Metaphysics. Chapters 1-5 of Book XII reiterate Aristotle's examination into the nature of thinghood (an inquiry which had previously appeared in Aristotle's Physics). Thinghood is a kind of whole (not a part of a whole) representing the sources as well as … Continue reading Reflections On Aristotle’s Prime Unmoved Mover

A Classical Hero in the Modern World: A Reading of Macbeth

The standard reading of Macbeth is that it is a tribute to King James I, Shakespeare's patron. As a relatively new king to the throne of England, James was fascinated with two chief themes found in Macbeth: witchcraft and regicide. James was a prolific writer and he wrote a book on the subject of witchcraft … Continue reading A Classical Hero in the Modern World: A Reading of Macbeth

Who Is William Shakespeare?

We know remarkably little about the life of William Shakespeare, the greatest English playwright and incomparable Renaissance writer. He was baptized on April 26, 1564 in Stratford-upon-Avon, which is located approximately 100 miles northwest of London. He was, therefore, likely born several days prior to his baptism (his birth date is traditionally given as April … Continue reading Who Is William Shakespeare?