A Defense of Justice in The Reeve’s Tale

The noble beginning of the competition en route to Canterbury has rapidly degenerated from the lofty "Knight's Tale" to a series of belligerent and vulgar tales from The Miller and the The Reeve. "The Knight's Tale" brought unanimous applause from the group, while "The Miller's Tale" brought 'different opinions,' with most listeners simply laughing in … Continue reading A Defense of Justice in The Reeve’s Tale

The Idea of Requital in The Miller’s Tale

The bawdy "Miller's Tale," the second in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales, brings to light the idea of requital. The Host initially chooses The Monk as the appropriate response to the noble Knight's Tale, however the drunken Miller, a 'loudmouth and a buffoon,' interrupts and demands to tell a tale. The Host refuses only until the Miller … Continue reading The Idea of Requital in The Miller’s Tale

On Eusebius’s Ecclesiastical History and the Origins of the Gospels

Eusebius is the noted historiographer of the early Christian Church. He lived during the 4th century AD and was the Bishop of Caesarea (a maritime region in northern Israel-Palestine). Like other early Christian theologians, Eusebius wrote voluminously, including apologetic texts, books about the Biblical canon, as well as a somewhat controversial book on the Life … Continue reading On Eusebius’s Ecclesiastical History and the Origins of the Gospels

Rebecca

Rebecca (1940) Director: Alfred Hitchcock Hitchcock's brilliant Oscar-winning film was based on Daphne du Maurier's novel of the same name (published in 1938), and which is, in turn, a similar re-telling of Charlotte Brontë's Gothic novel, Jane Eyre. Rebecca was Hitchcock's only film to win Best Picture from the Academy. David O. Selznick was hoping … Continue reading Rebecca