Thoughts on the “Newness” of the New Testament

Christianity, as exemplified in the Gospels, poses a new way for human beings. By creatively reformulating, and thus revitalizing, the mores of the ancient Hebrews, and claiming to fulfill their prophecies, Christianity sows the seeds for a new morality. Jesus completes the public revealing of the new morality in the so-called "sermon on the mount" … Continue reading Thoughts on the “Newness” of the New Testament

On The Logos in the Gospel of John

The Gospel According to John is distinct from the other three so-called "synoptic gospels" (so-named for their historical synopses of Jesus's life): Matthew, Mark, and Luke. In contrast, John presents an existential text filled with dichotomies: manichean lightness and darkness, friends and enemies, sons and fathers and so on. The Gospel can be read as a pre-Aquinas attempt to harmonize faith … Continue reading On The Logos in the Gospel of John

Comparing the Death of Jesus in the Four Gospels

Matthew According to the gospel of Matthew, Matthew was a "publican" or "tax collector" called by Jesus to follow him (5:9) though Mark and Luke identify this man as Levi. His gospel is anonymous, with the subscription of "according to Matthew" at least a couple hundred years after the death of Jesus. His gospel is, in some ways, a compilation … Continue reading Comparing the Death of Jesus in the Four Gospels

Matthew Chapters 5-7: The Sermon on the Mount

The Gospel (or "good news") according to Maththaîon is concerned with the fulfillment of ancient scriptures, hence why the text continually references the prophecies of Jeremiah. The gospel of Matthew takes great liberties to trace Jesus's genealogy to the ancient bloodline of Israel, as the objective is to persuade the general public of Jesus's divinity, through … Continue reading Matthew Chapters 5-7: The Sermon on the Mount

On Xenophon’s Account of Socrates in the Memorabilia

Xenophon's Memorabilia, or "recollections" is a treatise written to the greatest number of people. It is the longest and most beautiful of Xenophon's Socratic works. It is manifestly distinct from the Oeconomicus, which is Xenophon's natural response to Aristophanes's caricature of Socrates in The Clouds. Memorabilia is Xenophon's public apologia for Socrates. The text is written directly from Xenophon's first-person perspective, … Continue reading On Xenophon’s Account of Socrates in the Memorabilia

Comparing Virgil’s Georgics with Hesiod’s Works and Days

I recently read through John Dryden's impressive 1697 translation of Virgil's Georgics, one of the great pastoral poems of the Latin tradition. Dryden translated the poem into a heroic couplet form, though the original was written in the didactic hexameter form. The Georgics comes down to us from the Greek (georgika) meaning something akin to the … Continue reading Comparing Virgil’s Georgics with Hesiod’s Works and Days