Roman Britain – Claudius Invades Britannia (AD 43) & the End of Roman Britain

Nearly a hundred years passed since Julius Caesar launched Rome's inaugural skirmish into Britannia. During the course of that time Rome had decidedly degenerated into an imperial rulership. Julius Caesar was assassinated by his political opponents -he was stabbed to death on the floor of the Senate on March 15 in 44 BC. Following his … Continue reading Roman Britain – Claudius Invades Britannia (AD 43) & the End of Roman Britain

Roman Britain – Julius Caesar Invades Britannia (55-54 BC)

Most British history begins with the Romans. Winston Churchill opens his History of English Speaking Peoples with “In the summer of the Roman year 699, now described as the year 55 before the birth of Christ, the Proconsul of Gaul, Gaius Julius Caesar, turned his gaze upon Britain” (1). Before turning his gaze Britain, Julius … Continue reading Roman Britain – Julius Caesar Invades Britannia (55-54 BC)

Pre-Roman Britain

The idea of England does not appear until the eighth century when the "Venerable" Bede, a Northumbrian Benedictine monk, wrote his famous Historia Ecclesiastica Gentis Anglorum (or "Ecclesiastical History of the English People" -a book which highlights the tension between the Celtic and Catholic versions of Christianity in England. In addition, the book details the … Continue reading Pre-Roman Britain

An Appeal to Common Wisdom in the Final Tale: The Parson’s Tale

The "Parson's Tale" is the final story of The Canterbury Tales. In the "General Prologue," the Parson is described as a 'good man of religion.' He is erudite, scholarly, devout, and forgiving. The Parson believes that in order to be a good priest he must be perfect, because sheep follow their shepherd, but only if … Continue reading An Appeal to Common Wisdom in the Final Tale: The Parson’s Tale