On The Wisdom of Silence in The Manciple’s Tale

After the close of the "Canon's Yeoman's Tale" the Host merrily asks the embarrassingly drunken Cook to tell a tale (his earlier tale was left unfinished). However, the Cook can barely sit upon his horse, much less tell a tale. We find his character laughable because of his immoderate alcohol consumption and his physical ridiculousness … Continue reading On The Wisdom of Silence in The Manciple’s Tale

Gone With The Wind: An American Epic of Nostalgia and Survivalism

"...tomorrow is another day." In a rare interview with the Atlanta Journal in 1936, Margaret "Peggy" Mitchell described her debut (and only) novel, Gone With The Wind, as "the story of a girl named Scarlett O’Hara, who lived in Atlanta during the Civil War and the days of Reconstruction. The book isn’t strictly a book … Continue reading Gone With The Wind: An American Epic of Nostalgia and Survivalism

Trickery and Alchemy in the Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale

"But al thyng which that shineth as the goldNis nat gold, as that I have herd it told;" (962-963) Neither the Canon (a priestly administrator of a cathedral) nor his Yeoman are mentioned in Chaucer's "General Prologue." Instead, they ride quickly from the previous town and meet up with the traveling group of storytellers at Boughton … Continue reading Trickery and Alchemy in the Canon’s Yeoman’s Tale

Schindler’s List

Schindler's List (1993) Director: Steven Spielberg “Power is when we have every justification to kill, and we don’t.” ★★★★★ Schindler's List is a beautiful but harrowing and sobering holocaust film shot almost entirely in black and white. Amazingly, Spielberg was unsure about the project, and he tried several times to pass the film to other directors … Continue reading Schindler’s List